The G-8 Inviting Trouble? More Like Causing It for its LatAm, Caribbean and African Invitees

Posted on June 15, 2010

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g8cops

 Any time the G-8  invites a country to a meeting about combatting “security challenges,” it means two things:  millions of dollars for the purchase of weapons and other equipment and selling  the country’s soul by allowing the US to use land and military (or paramilitary) to achieve goals that will destroy relationships with neighboring countries.

Welcome to the next G-8 meeting to be held in Ontario, June 25 and 26.  As the article below states, it is common to invite African countries to G-8 meetings.  This year, Algeria, Egypt, Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal and South Africa will attend, but Stephen Harper, Canada’s PM, decided to invite a few countries closer to home — Jamaica, Colombia, and Haiti. 

There is a reason why these three countries were invited to the G-8.  First, it has nothing to do with drugs unless it helps the US advance its agenda for those things that it does not wish the Congress to know.   I think the common thread between the three countries is that they  will be used for US-coordinated jump out squads into other countries for the purpose of destablilizing them.  Obviously, Colombia needs no training in all this, but will be used to train Jamaica and Haiti in the art of militarization (or paramilitarization) and sabotage.

A look at the map, suggests that Cuba, Venezuela, and Ecuador will be following this G-8 meeting closely.

 

Globe editorial

The G8 is inviting trouble

A soldier on patrol walks past a wall painted with the image of reggae artist Bob Marley in the Tivoli Gardens neighborhood of Kingston May 27, 2010.

A soldier on patrol walks past a wall painted with the image of reggae artist Bob Marley in the Tivoli Gardens neighborhood of Kingston May 27, 2010. HANS DERYK/REUTERS

The leaders of Jamaica, Colombia and Haiti – along with those from seven African nations – will attend a special session in Muskoka to discuss how to combat security challenges.  

From Tuesday’s Globe and Mail

It is a long-established tradition of the G8 host to invite developing countries to take part in the summit. They are almost always from Africa. But this year, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has chosen to broaden the circle, and include three hemispheric partners to attend the meeting of eight industrialized nations, plus the European Union.

The leaders of Jamaica, Colombia and Haiti – along with those from seven African nations – will attend a special session in Muskoka on June 25 and 26, to discuss how to combat security challenges, and help nations weakened by violence and crime.

Mr. Harper’s choice reflects his oft-stated interest in the Americas, as well as the pressing need to plan for Haiti’s reconstruction, after its devastating earthquake. It also reflects the destabilizing impact of drug trafficking, and the need for co-operation in the war on drugs.

Colombia, the world’s leading coca producer, supplies cocaine to nearly all of the U.S. market, while Haiti and Jamaica are key transshipment points, favoured by traffickers because of their poorly patrolled coastlines and history of corruption.

Under President Alvaro Uribe, Colombia has succeeded in cutting its homicide rate in half, and in pushing back the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) from the cities, deep into the jungles. However, the FARC guerrillas still rely on proceeds from cocaine trafficking.

In Jamaica, successful drug enforcement efforts in recent years have reduced trafficking. Yet the country remains a significant producer of marijuana and a transit point for cocaine. Last month, its essential fragility was underscored by a violent eruption in a poor neighbourhood, when police entered to hunt down a gang leader, wanted in the U.S. on drugs and weapons charges. Seventy-three people were killed. Politicians from all parties have vowed to end the confluence of criminality and politics. But, clearly, there are challenges ahead.

Rene Préval, the President of Haiti, will share lessons learned from the chaotic delivery of aid in the days after the earthquake, which killed 200,000 and displaced one million. There were logistical confusion and disputes over priorities, as the country’s infrastructure collapsed completely.

Mr. Préval, Mr. Uribe and Jamaican Prime Minister Bruce Golding are witnesses to the challenges faced by countries vulnerable to transnational criminal organizations, and calamitous acts of nature. They cannot solve these problems alone, and it is to Mr. Harper’s credit that he has called on them to share their on-the-ground expertise.